A Sussex Uni Student Has Just Created A Plastic Bag Alternative Using Only Fish Offcuts

A Sussex Uni Student Has Just Created A Plastic Bag Alternative Using Only Fish Offcuts

A student from the University of Sussex has designed a sustainable plastic alternative bad made of fish skin and algae.

CREDIT: University of Sussex

It’s time for another amazing student success story!

Lucy Hughes, from the University of Sussex, has created a material that she has named MarinaTex. It’s made using entirely organic waste material from the sustainable fishing industry and red algae - and it helped her win the James Dyson Award this year.

The James Dyson Award is an international student design competition run by Sir James Dyson’s charity, the James Dyson Foundation, which aims to inspire the next generation of engineers. The competition brief is simple: design something that solves a problem.

And Lucy’s invention certainly does that. The bioplastic is stronger than a plastic bag, does not leach toxins, and is fully biodegradable and compostable. Lucy hopes that with the right support, MarinaTex could be on the market by the second half of 2020.

thumbnail_Lucy.jpg

Hughes said in a statement:

"It makes no sense to me that we are using plastic, an incredibly durable material, for products that have a life-cycle of less than a day. And I'm not alone, there is a growing community of bioplastic pioneers that are working towards finding alternatives to our dependency on plastic. With MarinaTex, we are transforming a waste stream into the main component of a new product. By doing so, we have created a consistent, transparent and plastic-like material with a more planet friendly and product appropriate life-cycle for packaging."

Mtex bag big.jpg

According to Lucy, one Atlantic cod could generate as much organic waste as is needed for making 1400 bags of MarinaTex.

Finally some good news for the environment! Congrats, Lucy. We look forward to seeing what awesome concept you come up with next.

Facebook Page Dedicated To People Who Hate Coriander Has Nearly 250,000 Members

Facebook Page Dedicated To People Who Hate Coriander Has Nearly 250,000 Members

10 McDonald's Hacks That Will Change Your Life

10 McDonald's Hacks That Will Change Your Life